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Dictionary of terms
On the MICROPHASE COATINGS, INC (microphasecoatings.com) site we speak of certain sciences and technologies that either describe our products or describe the process. This dictionary was created so all that read this site can use the same definitions as we at MICROPHASE COATINGS, INC. This will allow us all to have a common understanding of our product line.

The Terms
De-Icing
Hydrophobic
Super Hydrophobic
Hydrophilic
Icephobic

De-Icing
De-icing is the process of removing ice from a surface. Deicing can be accomplished by mechanical methods (scraping), through the application of heat, by use of chemicals designed to lower the freezing point of water (various salts or alcohols), or a combination of these different techniques.

Hydrophobic
Hydrophobe (from the Greek (hydros) "water" and (phobos) "fear") in chemistry refers to the physical property of a molecule that is repelled from a mass of water. Hydrophobic molecules in water often cluster together. Water on hydrophobic surfaces will exhibit a high contact angle. Examples of hydrophobic molecules include the alkanes, oils, fats, and greasy substances in general. Hydrophobic materials are used for oil removal from water, the management of oil spills, and chemical separation processes to remove non-polar from polar compounds. Hydrophobic is often used interchangeably with "lipophilic". However, the two terms are not synonymous. While hydrophobic substances are usually lipophilic, there are exceptions the silicones, for instance.

According to thermodynamics, matter seeks to be in a low-energy state, and bonding reduces chemical energy. Water is electrically polarized, and is able to form hydrogen bonds internally, which gives it many of its unique physical properties. But, since hydrophobes are not electrically polarized, and because they are unable to form hydrogen bonds, water repels hydrophobes, in favor of bonding with itself. It is this effect that causes the hydrophobic interaction — which in itself is incorrectly named as the energetic force comes from the hydrophilic molecules. Thus the two immiscible phases (hydrophilic vs. hydrophobic) will change so that their corresponding interfacial area will be minimal. This effect can be visualized in the phenomenon called phase separation.

Super Hydrophobic
Superhydrophobic materials have surfaces that are extremely difficult to wet with water contact angles in excess of 150. Many of these very hydrophobic materials found in nature rely on Cassie's law and are biphasic on the submicrometer level with one component air. The Lotus effect is based on this principle. An example of a biomimetic superhydrophobic material in nanotechnology is nanopin film. In one study a vanadium pentoxide surface is presented that can switch reversibly between superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity under the influence of UV radiation. According to the study any surface can be modified to this effect by application of an suspension of rose-like V2O5 particles for instance with an inkjet printer. Once again hydrophobicity is induced by interlaminar air pockets (separated by 2.1 nm distances). The UV effect is also explained. UV light creates electron-hole pairs, with the holes reacting with lattice oxygen creating surface oxygen vacancies while the electrons reduce V5+ to V3+. The oxygen vacancies are met by water and this water absorbency by the vanadium surface makes it hydrophilic. By extended storage in the dark, water is replaced by oxygen and hydrophilicity is once again lost.

Hydrophilic
From the Greek (hydros) "water" and (philia) "friendship," refers to a physical property of a molecule that can transiently bond with water (H2O) through hydrogen bonding. This is thermodynamically favorable, and makes these molecules soluble not only in water, but also in other polar solvents. There are hydrophillic and hydrophobic parts of the cell membrane.

A hydrophilic molecule or portion of a molecule is one that is typically charge-polarized and capable of hydrogen bonding, enabling it to dissolve more readily in water than in oil or other hydrophobic solvents. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules are also known as polar molecules and nonpolar molecules, respectively.

Soap has a hydrophilic head and a hydrophobic tail which allows it to dissolve in both waters and oils, therefore allowing the soap to clean a surface.

Icephobic
Liquid and/or solid anti-icing fillers and/or oils are combined with erosion resistant silicone and/or fluorocarbon elastomeric materials to create erosion resistant anti-icing coatings. These coatings may be utilized to prevent ice build-up on various gas turbine engine components, aircraft components, watercrafts (i.e., boats and ships), power lines, telecommunication lines, etc.


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©2007 MICROPHASE COATINGS, INC. 3916 Yateswood Ct. Raleigh, NC 27603. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.

Specializing in Hydrophobic, Super Hydrophobic, Icephobic, Thermal Barrier, Foul Release, Non-Fouling, Anti-Corrosion, Anti-icing, Non-Stick, Poly-Urea, Silane, Silicone, Polysiloxane, Epoxy and other specialty coatings and products.


Products include: PhaseBrite, PhaseBreak, Correz, CorrBlock, ThermaBlock.